Monthly Archives: October 2011

Rape is a four-letter word

Johnny Depp recently said in an interview for Esquire magazine that ‘being photographed is like being raped’. This sparked controversy the world over, with groups such as The Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) speaking out to condemn his words. The comparison has been made before though, last year by Kristin Stewart. And whilst it is abhorrent to liken the two, is there some good to come of it in a knock-on effect? Rape has always been something to keep swept under the carpet, not telling people through fear or even shame. There are an average of 5000 rapes reported each year in the UK, but how many more are hidden? Talking about it will help not only the victims in moving on, but also other women who may be too scared to speak out. We need to get rid of the stigma that rape is somehow the woman’s ‘fault’. Women around the world are standing up for themselves and saying enough is enough. “Whatever we wear, and wherever we go, yes means yes, and no means no!” This is the chant of the ‘Slut Walks’ which have been taking place around the world, and the message is empowering to females everywhere. However, whilst this is something positive from the ‘new wave’ feminist movement, it is still inexcusable to compare being sexually assaulted to having your picture taken. These celebrities are just that, celebrities, it comes with the territory. Of course the paparazzi can behave like a pack of baited wolves, but A-listers step out of the door expecting it. No woman expects to be raped, and it is almost sick to suggest that having your photograph taken unwanted is akin to being physically violated. In future Mr Depp may want to think more carefully about his choice of words. As for Kristin Stewart, I hope she never has to experience the horror behind that particular statement for herself.

The writer

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Dave’s history lessons

Imagine, if you will, a country like England, 20 years from now. Except this is nothing like the England we know. At the age of 12, each citizen is required to take a test, a test which decides if they get to stay in the country, or if they must be banished to a far away land full of poverty and war. On Monday, David Cameron announced plans to crack down on illegal immigrants in the UK. He urged people to ‘shop’ anyone they believed to be living in the country unlawfully, and also outlined plans to change our existing citizenship test, adding questions on topics such as The Magna Carta and Winston Churchill. Now I’m not stupid, but my knowledge of history is limited, and I wonder whether I would ‘pass’ and be allowed to live in this country if the test were extended to everyone. Of course this is (hopefully!) never going to happen, but you must debate the fairness of asking someone from another country to answer a series of questions about a land foreign to them, when a large percentage of the natives may not even be able to pass such a test. I personally am questioning the point in doing such tests; they would involve a lot of time, money and resources that really should be going elsewhere, just to weed out those who haven’t done their research before coming to the country, often fleeing war and destitution. If they are trying to filter the sort of people allowed into the country, surely a psychometric test would be more beneficial? I’d be happier knowing no so-called extremists or psychopaths were let into the country, rather than having a ban on those who are not very good at history. Whether or not these tests go ahead, I think maybe Dave needs to focus more on sorting out the country and less on chasing up history homework!

The writer

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The girl behind the notebook

(weird style as had to do it for my journalism assignment!)

Jenny Mullinder is a second year creative writing student. Studying short story writing, culture, theory and narratives in poetry and drama, advanced poetry writing, and journalism and print production, she hopes to go into journalism, marketing and PR or events. At almost 20 years old, she is just starting to find her writing voice. Some of her favourite authors are; Cecilia Ahern, Jenny Downham, Sophie Kinsella, and Lauren Weisberger.  Jennys’ first year was quite a whirlwind, always full of some drama or other, but this year she is really focusing on her studies, and her part time job managing her University’s marketing and PR for Studentsxchange London, a company set up by an ex-Greenwich student to connect, inform and help students across London. She was involved with ‘The Crows Nest’ during her first year, and this year hopes to become part of Latitude radio. Jenny enjoys a variety of television programmes, from Doctor Who to Glee, and also likes romance, ‘chick-flick’ and comedy films such as ‘Moulin Rouge’, ‘Zoolander’ and ‘500 Days of Summer’. Constantly plugged into her iPod, music is one of this young writers’ biggest passions and influences. Listening to anything from Ellie Goulding to Example, her tastes could be described as diverse, or simply random! Jenny subscribes to Cosmopolitan and Company magazines, and her secret dream is to one day work for them. Jenny recently moved into a house in Hither Green with her boyfriend and friends, and is in the process of decorating her room, so is always on the lookout for unusual or interesting furniture or pictures. Her boyfriend will not have much of a say in this.

The writer

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